Digital and Multichannel Marketing Recruiter http://www.bernhart.com Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC - Since 1990 - See more at: http://www.bernhart.com/#sthash.4WexwGGB.dpuf Fri, 19 Jan 2018 10:03:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.9 Adapting Corporate Culture When Hiring a Digital Marketing Leader http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-leader/ http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-leader/#respond Sun, 24 Dec 2017 21:31:05 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2987 I write a lot about the importance of cultural fit when it comes to recruiting and placing a digital marketing leader. It was important when I first started recruiting senior marketing leaders some 28 years ago, and it is important today. In fact, candidates as well as employers tell me that in this age of…

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I write a lot about the importance of cultural fit when it comes to recruiting and placing a digital marketing leader. It was important when I first started recruiting senior marketing leaders some 28 years ago, and it is important today. In fact, candidates as well as employers tell me that in this age of customer journeys and integrated touchpoints, culture is the number one barrier to digital effectiveness. A 2017 survey by McKinsey backs that up. Nearly one third of respondents reported that internal behavioral challenges represent the most significant challenge for companies in achieving digital priorities. More specifically, three cultural deficiencies are spotlighted: Risk aversion, siloed departments and difficulty forming and acting on a single view of the customer. Sound familiar? And that’s on TOP of other landmines such as lack of IT infrastructure, lack of dedicated funding, and a lack of internal alignment between digital and more traditional business stakeholders.

As I look back on 2017, the ability to overcome cultural shortcomings was a defining characteristic among every executive-level digital marketing leader I placed. They know that in order for organizations to succeed, cultures must become less risk averse, siloed thinking must broaden, and having a single view of the customer must be a unifying force. It’s truly exciting to watch them apply their talents to help transform cultures. A marketing chief I placed at the beginning of the year with a multi-billion dollar energy company entered a place where “test and fail” was the stuff of high school science lab. She’s made enormous strides in helping her people feel comfortable with trying things that don’t work, and then trying again. They can also now make spending decisions for projects that used to require C-level approval. Busting down silos will take more time. Walls are a funny thing; we naturally trust our strongholds. I remember a wise man once told me long ago that it’s very difficult to tear down walls, whether organizational or physical, that have been standing for a long time. But these candidates jump right in and do what they do best: Take those first small steps to promote more cross-functional collaboration to bring a sense of shared understanding, with the goal of achieving a greater level of customer-centricity.

Because digital marketing is so data-driven, I should also mention the importance of driving more data transparency across the organization. Actually, data transparently is as old as data collection itself:

Cave man: “Look here, I brought you a rabbit”

Cave wife: “That’s nice, but we don’t need a rabbit”

Cave man: “What do you mean? I busted my butt to catch this”

Cave wife: “Didn’t you see the five hash marks under ‘Rabbit’ on the cave wall? We already have five of them. We’re good.”

Some things never change.

TechTarget calls data the “lifeblood” of the new information economy. As my digital marketing leader candidates know so well, the key is embedding data usage into processes so that it’s accessible to individuals across the enterprise, enabling the business to get closer to its customers. I’m excited to see what unfolds in 2018 as more companies contact my office realizing that cultural transformation when hiring a digital marketing leader is no longer a choice.

Their futures may very well depend on it.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 90 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

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The Vice President Digital Marketing Comes of Age http://www.bernhart.com/vice-president-digital-marketing/ http://www.bernhart.com/vice-president-digital-marketing/#respond Sun, 26 Nov 2017 19:47:05 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2967 No doubt about it- 2017 has been a banner year for Vice President Digital Marketing candidates. The number of searches I conducted was up considerably over 2016 with the majority of them newly created roles rather than just replacements, which of course speaks to the growing importance of digital commerce in overall business strategy. Salaries for…

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No doubt about it- 2017 has been a banner year for Vice President Digital Marketing candidates. The number of searches I conducted was up considerably over 2016 with the majority of them newly created roles rather than just replacements, which of course speaks to the growing importance of digital commerce in overall business strategy. Salaries for Vice President Digital Marketing continue to rise (many receiving equity packages where there were none before), budgets are growing, and more of these VP’s are stepping up into C-level roles including CDO, CMO and even President. As the commercial internet enters its third decade, we’re seeing something of a shift in the candidate supply/demand curve: The supply of the most experienced digital marketing and ecommerce talent is rising, while at the same time demand for this level of talent is strengthening. This points to a continued bright outlook for both Directors and VP’s who are thinking about career options for 2018.

For those who are looking ahead, it’s informative to look back at the placements I completed this past year and explore what my conversations with hiring managers revealed about why one Vice President Digital Marketing candidate was tapped for the job and others were passed over. At this level it all pretty much comes down to cultural fit, personal chemistry, management style and other intangibles, and several elements definitely stood out:

– They had strong leadership skills. Because digital marketing is so transitional in nature, a newly hired Vice President Digital Marketing is coming into roles to manage existing staffs that need direction, motivation, and development. Fully half my searches this past year were confidential replacement situations, posing even greater challenges for incoming Veeps to step in and gain the respect of their department. The ones who we’re hired tended to have what I call an “inspirational” element, the ability to inspire cooperation, trust and change.

-They’re still willing to be hands-on. Digital marketing and ecommerce, by definition, are about as “roll up your sleeves” as you can get, and while Vice President Digital Marketing roles are highly strategic it’s not unusual for clients to ask for candidates at this level who can still push the buttons and pull the levers. In early stage start-ups and in environments where there is organizational ambiguity and lack of formal structure, flying low to the ground is essential. Even in the biggest organizations, a willingness to “dirty your fingernails” often comes with the job .

-They’re able to forge strong cross-functional relationships. In digital marketing and ecommerce, this is truly mission critical. Vice President Digital Marketing candidates work closely with people in other departments who sometimes know as much about digital marketing and ecommerce as they do about 13th century monarchs of Crimea. The more you can understand what’s important to sales or finance or customer service, the better the relationships you’ll forge within the organization. You could be a world authority in digital marketing and ecommerce but without good internal relationships, especiallywithin organizations that are multichannel, you will face stiff headwinds.

-Good at budgeting (This one falls outside the “cultural fit” category, but definitely worth mentioning). Vice President Digital Marketing candidates are being asked to do significantly more with only incremental increases in budget, particularly in organizations where online sales already account for the lion’s share of the business. The ability to optimize costs while still delivering on business goals has been a proven candidate differentiator.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 90 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

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Tales From the Black Hole: Three Decades of Mind-Twisting Stories as a Marketing Recruiter http://www.bernhart.com/marketing-recruiter/ http://www.bernhart.com/marketing-recruiter/#respond Sun, 26 Nov 2017 00:09:07 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2964 Next week, CNBC premiers a new series called “The Job Interview.” It brings viewers inside the office as real employers conduct real interviews with real candidates. If the producers need any show ideas, I would be an excellent script advisor. After nearly three decades as an independent marketing recruiter and more than 550 marketing recruiter…

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Next week, CNBC premiers a new series called “The Job Interview.” It brings viewers inside the office as real employers conduct real interviews with real candidates. If the producers need any show ideas, I would be an excellent script advisor. After nearly three decades as an independent marketing recruiter and more than 550 marketing recruiter placements, there isn’t much I haven’t seen or heard. I have found myself in some pretty mind-bending situations. I’ve often thought: One day I should write a book. If I do, it would be both thought-provoking as well as highly entertaining:

As a veteran marketing recruiter, I’ve placed VP’s and CMO’s with companies ranging from a Fortune 25 to ill-funded start-ups with barely a business plan. I even placed a candidate with a beef processor.

I’ve negotiated placements involving employment contracts that were up to 25 pages long, one even governing the kinds of “outside activities” my candidate should engage in. I’ve also placed highly paid senior-level candidates who went to work, literally, on nothing more than a smile and a handshake. This could have inspired a great Aretha Franklin hit record: T-R-U-S-T

I placed one candidate who was offered a job on the spot and officially started before the interview even ended.

I had one search that stretched 19 months, they interviewed more than 60 candidates, and they still didn’t hire anyone. Employers: Don’t try this.

I’ve worked with clients in cities as large as New York, and in one town in Texas that has a population of about 250. Yes, my candidate actually relocated there.

I placed a marketing analyst who climbed up the ranks over a period of 18 years, to eventually become the company President. Hard work can definitely pay off.

I had one candidate turn down a job offer because he decided he wanted 8 weeks of vacation plus a 3-month sabbatical- all during the first 18 months.

There have also been some very sad experiences. I placed a candidate who passed away six weeks after he started. Died in his sleep at a trade show.

I can’t even count the number of times I’ve prevented the loss of a highly sought after candidate thanks to some creative maneuvering. I helped one candidate buy a new car because he said the clunker he owned wouldn’t survive the commute.

One client went the extra mile, literally, to kick-off a new search. He visited with me at my home to discuss his newly created position while I was recuperating from foot surgery. He came here from out of state, specifically to see me, on his private plane.

I’ve sat down with multi-generational family-owned businesses whose brands have become icons of American culture. One such CEO even gave me a ride in his new Tesla, rocketing from zero to 100 before I could blink. I’m still trying to dislodge my stomach from my throat.

I remember one candidate who sent a $10,000 check to an employer, just for hiring him. The check was returned.

I helped one new client by working a booth shift while I was attending a major industry conference. This marketing recruiter landed their second largest deal at the show.

One candidate threatened to sue me because he flew coach, rather than first class, to the interview.

I conducted a search once for Kevin Harrington of TV’s “Shark Tank” fame. I got to spend time with him at a conference in Las Vegas, hanging out in the most ornate, lavish hotel suite you could ever possibly imagine. Did I mention the silk-upholstered walls?

One of my biggest clients sells gold bullion, and their offices are located in the same building as their vaults. In an adjacent room with blast-proof walls and bullet proof windows, I met with three executives all wearing shoulder holsters containing very large guns. “Well,” I observed. “At least I know I’m safe in here.”

I relocated one candidate from California to Minnesota, in the middle of January. The temperature was a record -29 degrees the morning she reported to work. Amazingly, she did NOT quit that day and turn right around and head back to California. In fact, she’s now been there several years.

At one trade conference I was so widely recognized as a leading marketing recruiter that confidentiality became a major concern, so I literally held meetings behind a row of big bushes outside the hotel. I even had an impromptu desk- an upside down garbage can.

One candidate I placed had an extremely memorable first week. On her first day, her boss quit. On her second day, the CEO quit. On her third day, the company announced it was being sold. Two days later, the new owners announced they were moving the company to another city. At that point, my candidate quit. She cited “too much change for my comfort level.” No kidding.

I had one situation in which I was contacted by an employer to replace someone whom I already had recruited and was actively working with, and in fact, we were expecting an offer at any time. He was waffling on the new opportunity, however, thinking he had a bright long-term future with his current company who told me they were going to fire him him as soon as I could find his replacement. Talk about an ethical dilemma. To make a long story shorter, it had a very positive ending with the incumbent landing a much bigger opportunity, and me backfilling his position. The recruiting Gods work in mysterious ways.

In another memorable situation, my candidate received an immediate counter-offer from his current employer, which was promptly matched by my client. A fierce bidding war broke out and each company countered and matched 6 more times. When the counter-offer dust settled, my candidate was looking at about a 75% increase in salary when he took the job with my client, plus double the normal vacation. As I recall, this candidate held a patent that literally represented the future of this business.

I debriefed a candidate once who told me that the hiring manager dropped the “F” bomb at least 50 times during the interview. “No matter,” he said. “I used it just as much.” Yikes. Must have been some strong chemistry there: He ended up working with them for more than 6 years.

I once conducted a confidential replacement search. The President of the company asked me to come visit their offices, and while I was there personally fire the person my candidate was replacing. I declined.

One interview lasted 9 hours. It began in the client’s office, moved to a restaurant, and then to a hotel until around midnight. Let’s just say they had a meeting of the minds.

I’ll be tuning in to “The Job Interview” next week to see what kinds of real-life situations they portray. One thing is for sure: The stories they could tell will be limited only by the bounds of human behavior.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 80 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter

#ecommercerecruiter, #e-commercerecruiter, #digitalmarketingrecruiter, #CMOrecruiter, #CRMrecruiter, #marketingrecruiter, #marketingheadhunter, #executiverecruiter, #bernhartworkingknowledge

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Digital Marketing Career Path: Transitioning from Agency to Brand Side http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-career-path/ http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-career-path/#respond Fri, 24 Nov 2017 01:38:28 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2960 As a digital marketer, you have multiple options when it comes to your digital marketing career path: Agencies, brands, or going your own way. The go-it-alone crowd is still a small minority. Most marketers will find themselves either working on the agency/services side, or on the client side. In my book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital…

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As a digital marketer, you have multiple options when it comes to your digital marketing career path: Agencies, brands, or going your own way. The go-it-alone crowd is still a small minority. Most marketers will find themselves either working on the agency/services side, or on the client side. In my book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” I talk about the advantages of starting your digital marketing career path on the agency side. There are many: It’s the perfect environment for developing your interpersonal skills as you interact with different clients and varied internal teams, you learn to be accountable for your time, agency people learn a variety of problem solving skills, you get good a multi-tasking and handling pressure, and agencies are all about creating and presenting ideas which allows you to hone your communication skills. These qualities will set up you well for your future on the client side where someday you’ll develop strategy, grow a brand, analyze your audience, and use data to make key business decisions.

At the more junior levels, resumes that switch back and forth between agencies and marketers are not uncommon. However, as anyone who’s been on the agency side for many years knows, it’s not always easy to make that jump later in your career. That was especially true in the days before ecommerce became mainstream. Candidates back then with 15 or 20 years of agency experience rarely had a shot. They were stereotyped, pidgenholed. “We live in a different world,” agency clients would exclaim. “We need someone who knows the challenges of growing a business.” But a funny thing happened on the way to the digital revolution: The lines began to blur. Disruption is disruption, regardless of which side of the fence you’re on. Companies are striving to break outside the norm, and agencies are where much of that breakage begins. Company cultures used to be more like, “work sort of hard, play sort of hard.” Now it’s, “work hard, play hard.” That’s the way agencies have always been. You want fast, frenetic and high pressure? Agency candidates have you covered there. Looking to bring a particular digital marketing or ecommerce expertise in-house? I’ve placed some killer agency-side candidates who live and breath this stuff, essentially becoming de facto internal go-to experts for their clients. Want good leaders? Agencies have many of the best I know. Looking for top strategic thinkers, prioritizers and project managers? Agencies have tons of them.

No question about it: The barriers for agency types to join the client-side club have been coming down. My advice for anyone looking to make that transition in your digital marketing career path is pretty straightforward: When interviewing for a brand position, emphasize every aspect of your agency experience and skills that speak to their need, and often, that starts with the industry they’re in. Find a company in an industry that you have some experience with that is NOT on the leading edge of digital commerce, and show them how you can get them there.

There’s your ticket!

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 90 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter, digital marketing career path

#ecommercerecruiter, #e-commercerecruiter, #digitalmarketingrecruiter, #CMOrecruiter, #CRMrecruiter, #marketingrecruiter, #marketingheadhunter, #executiverecruiter

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Interview Prep: Having Basic Marketing Automation Skills http://www.bernhart.com/marketing-automation-skills/ http://www.bernhart.com/marketing-automation-skills/#respond Mon, 20 Nov 2017 01:25:56 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2958 Recently a Director-level digital marketing candidate I’ve been working with wanted to know if she should take classes to bring her marketing automation skills up to speed before she begins a serious job search. Her question went something like this: “Should I take classes to become a power user of specific marketing automation tools such…

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Recently a Director-level digital marketing candidate I’ve been working with wanted to know if she should take classes to bring her marketing automation skills up to speed before she begins a serious job search.

Her question went something like this:

“Should I take classes to become a power user of specific marketing automation tools such as Marketo or Eloqua to sharpen my marketing automation skills to help improve my chances of landing a digital marketing job?

Good question. I think of all of us would agree that any marketer who wants to get ahead should know the basics of marketing automation, which as we all well know has been growing at an astonishing rate. But should you spend time and money becoming a hands-on ninja in a specific marketing automation tool, with which you’ve had no previous experience, to get a possible leg up in an interview?

I wouldn’t rush into it.

Let me explain.

While I’m a huge advocate of continued learning and even look for it on resumes, digital marketing and ecommerce technology is moving quicker than a Ken Giles fastball. Whatever software version you learn today could be outdated technology in a few months because of new releases and updates. And when you consider the dizzying number of technology solutions that are out there, you’d be trying to chase a horse that just keeps on galloping faster.

Here are some other factors to consider:

-Even if you did take the time and spend the money to get proficient with a particular software tool- and let’s say it even helped you land a job- there’s no guarantee your new employer will stick with it. Priorities change, needs change, agencies change, applications change. The best platform for a company’s marketing needs today could be inadequate six months from now. Your marketing automation skills could become unneeded.

-All the software learning programs in the world won’t help if an employer really wants someone who has day-to-day, in the trenches, hands-on experience with a particular tool. You either have that specific expertise, or you don’t. If you don’t, but you still get hired, you can learn it, quickly. Chances are, you’ve had to learn plenty of other things on the job and on the fly. In digital marketing and ecommerce, it comes with the territory. You wouldn’t have made it to Director if you weren’t a good learner.

-Some of these tools are monstrously complex. Learning about them is one thing, but actually pulling the levers and pushing the buttons is another. Like anything else that requires practice to get good, if you don’t use it, you lose it.

Bottom line: A certificate program or other learning that covers the fundamental topics of digital marketing or marketing automation skills will probably do you much more good than studying in-depth tutorials on the latest release of a specific marketing automation platform. Marketo and Hubspot, for example, offer entire libraries of free training videos, definitely good enough for interview purposes if you haven’t used those tools in the past. You can also check out my own directory of learning resources at https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/looking-further-your-digital-marketing-knowledge-list-jerry/ If a hiring manager starts asking you to explain Eloqua’s contact database architecture, be glad he or she did because they’ve just handed you a red flag. At the Director or VP-level, they should be focusing more on cultural fit, how well you can think strategically, manage P and L, exert influence at higher levels, and how well you direct and motivate others who work with these tools at ground level on a daily basi, instead of your in-the-trenches marketing automation skills

These are the elements that truly will determine your success.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 90 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter, digital marketing career path, marketing automation skills

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Holiday Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Hiring: The Most Wonderful Time of the Year http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-and-ecommerce-hiring/ http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-and-ecommerce-hiring/#respond Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:56:56 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2955 You might think that the last few months of the year would be a slow time for digital marketing and ecommerce hiring. After all, for many businesses, particularly those that sell consumer products, the crazy season is about to begin. But you might be surprised to know that the October through December period traditionally is…

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You might think that the last few months of the year would be a slow time for digital marketing and ecommerce hiring. After all, for many businesses, particularly those that sell consumer products, the crazy season is about to begin. But you might be surprised to know that the October through December period traditionally is my busiest time of year, and this year has been no exception. In fact, I have to think back many years, back to the Great Recession in 2009 in fact, when fourth quarter activity tailed off, and the very reason why Q4 heats up is the same reason why you think it might lag: The holidays.

Filling a mission critical digital commerce leadership position does not take a lengthy holiday break. Budgets are set, the year-end clock is ticking, and hiring decisions made in November and December help tee up managers to hit the ground running early in the New Year. My advice for those who have positions they want filled during the first quarter of 2018: Start interviewing NOW. It may seem early, but I always tell my employers there’s the amount of time you hope the digital marketing and ecommerce hiring process will take, and then there’s reality. For Directors and VP’s, we’re talking, realistically, 60-90 days, and more often than not, it’s closer to 90 after you factor in the back and forth of offer negotiations and giving two-week notice (which often is more like three weeks or even a month). So, for searches starting now you’d be looking at a start date possibly as soon as mid-January. If you wait until New Year’s you may not fill that crucial digital marketing or ecommerce role until mid March or even later if your finalist still has a bonus coming. Many actively looking candidates, if given a choice, would just as soon give notice sooner rather than waiting until next Spring to make their move.

Seasonality also tends to give actively looking candidates a boost when it comes to digital marketing and ecommerce hiring.

People’s calendars this time of year fill up with trips, family gatherings, holiday parties, shopping, you name it. That means less time to devote to a job search, so it is a great time to gain an edge because of less competition. Come January, I can guarantee you that will change. Along with weight loss and more exercise, finding a new job is a perennial New Year’s resolution, so you’ve got a good two months to keep some distance between yourself and the coming thundering herd.

Not only is the calendar working in your favor, so is the economy. Many key indicators are pointing in a very positive direction. National unemployment is at a ten year low, wages are on the rise, each day it seems brings another new high for the stock market, consumer confidence remains strong, and for those of us in digital commerce, here’s the best news of all: During the second quarter, more than 12% of total retail spending occurred on the web, according to the U.S. Commerce Department, a whopping 16% jump over the year before (The government will report Q3 online retail sales on November 17).

Contrary to what many people might believe, the next 60 days is a great time to do digital marketing and ecommerce hiring. and a great time to keep your job search in high gear.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 80 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter, digital marketing and ecommerce hiring.

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The Growing Demand for B2B Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Specialists http://www.bernhart.com/b2b-digital-marketing-and-ecommerce/ http://www.bernhart.com/b2b-digital-marketing-and-ecommerce/#respond Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:52:55 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2953 People often ask me: What trends am I seeing these days in the recruitment and hiring of digital commerce leaders? One definitely stands out: The steady rise in B2B digital marketing and ecommerce hiring. McKinsey reports that two-thirds of businesses surveyed said digital engagement of customers is among their top three strategic priorities. Look at…

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People often ask me: What trends am I seeing these days in the recruitment and hiring of digital commerce leaders? One definitely stands out: The steady rise in B2B digital marketing and ecommerce hiring. McKinsey reports that two-thirds of businesses surveyed said digital engagement of customers is among their top three strategic priorities. Look at Amazon. Five years ago, I don’t think too many people would have considered Amazon to be a serious B2B player. They are definitely a player today, and I know so because in conversations with B2B hiring managers many are now talking about the “Amazon effect.” I think Amazon has done an amazing job leveraging their expertise in B2C and turning that into products they can sell to businesses.

Five years ago, calls and emails from B2B’ers accounted for maybe one out of every five searches. Today, fully one-half of my practice is B2B digital marketing and ecommerce hiring, and there have been brief periods when it’s reached as much as three-quarters or more. According to Gallup, only 29% of B2B customers are engaged with the companies they do business with. Sounds like pretty fertile ground to me. My number one search right now is with a multi-billion dollar manufacturer that knows it needs to do a better job exploiting the digital channel, and what’s interesting is that this push didn’t just come from just the CIO to whom this position reports. It came out of a series of meetings at the highest levels of the company’s executive branch, spearheaded by the CEO himself who declared that delivering a subpar customer experience is “no longer an option.” They’ve already been transacting online for many years so we’re not talking about a seismic cultural shift, but this particular manufacturer takes product to market through thousands of distributors, dealers and wholesalers, not to mention their own sales force and also some direct to end-user. In this environment, managing customer engagement is truly multi-dimensional.

Pretty exciting stuff!

I’ve heard many B2B hiring managers give example after example of how online customer experience is cumbersome and inefficient. Lack of speed and visibility is huge. Post-sale customer service is sub-par. No fault of anyone’s really because more often than not, in large B2B enterprises that responsibility falls under IT. Customer engagement, of course, is an art and science all of its own. Using the example of the search I am working on currently- Director of Ecommerce and Digital Transformation as we’re titling it- this will report directly to the CIO, putting this position on par with his other IT department heads. By extracting this function from software developers and systems integrators, and putting it in the hands of an expert who’s done it before in a similar business environment and who knows how to lead internal change, customer centricity can truly prosper.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 80 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter, B2B digital marketing and ecommerce

#ecommercerecruiter, #e-commercerecruiter, #digitalmarketingrecruiter, #CMOrecruiter, #CRMrecruiter, #marketingrecruiter, #marketingheadhunter, #executiverecruiter

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As CRM Enters its Third Decade, Demand for the Vice President of CRM is as Strong as Ever http://www.bernhart.com/vice-president-of-crm/ http://www.bernhart.com/vice-president-of-crm/#respond Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:45:13 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2950 As I embark on yet another search for a Vice  President of CRM, I once again observe the growing, widespread adoption of CRM as a top strategic business priority. When I first started recruiting in this space in 2001, the acronym CRM was about as well known as API. We can all thank Fred Newell,…

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As I embark on yet another search for a Vice  President of CRM, I once again observe the growing, widespread adoption of CRM as a top strategic business priority. When I first started recruiting in this space in 2001, the acronym CRM was about as well known as API. We can all thank Fred Newell, who many consider to be the “Godfather” of CRM, for putting it into the business lexicon. As CEO of Seklemian/Newell, he was already an internationally renowned visionary and sought after marketing consultant. I vividly remember sitting down with Fred in 1999 at the annual DMA conference in San Francisco. I don’t recall what the circumstances were, but we shared an enormous base of common contacts in the database marketing field (which at the time was my main focus), and we had been introduced. He talked about his new (first) book, The New Rules of Marketing – How To Use One-to-One Relationship Marketing to be the Leader in Your Industry. He explained how there would be a strong demand for highly specialized CRM talent and he suggested that I learn as much as I could and get to know the players, which I did. Here’s this international guru offering fatherly advice to a common headhunter. Wow, I remember thinking: Better listen to him, and listen to him good! Today, CRM is fully one-quarter to one-third of my executive search practice, and I credit Fred for helping me “see the light.” Fred passed away in 2007, but his torch remains lit and shines as bright as ever at the CRMC Conference, which he started, and now under the brilliant direction of Devon Wylie. Those of us who have devoted so much of our professional lives to this field now consider the CRMC a must attend for anyone in the retail space.

One of the joys of recruiting in this field is hearing how CRM has positively impacted so many businesses. I am reaching out to many senior level CRM leaders in connection with this latest search who are with brands that just a few years ago had no such role on the org chart. Here is just a sampling of what I am hearing:

-The Vice President of CRM for a large insurer told me how their agents are experiencing multiple increases in productivity.

-Another Vice President of CRM talked about how it has allowed workers at a large automaker we all know to work together across multiple continents.

-At one large pharmaceutical company, sales reps are generating new quotes in a matter of hours.

-One CRM consultant I know well told me how some municipalities are even adopting CRM principles to engage citizens.

-The Vice President of CRM for a mid-size media company described how it has helped in the transition to digital readership (I have seen this first hand with several placements I made just last year with publishers).

-Many tell me how it has boosted the use of mobile technology.

-CRM is also transforming sales processes with social selling and mobile apps, and at some companies is being credited for reducing the sales cycle from months to days.

As I’ve written about many times over the years, CRM can be a complex machine with many moving parts. It can represent a seismic cultural shift moving a company from a traditional product-based management culture to one that is more customer-centric. Ask three senior executives to define CRM, you might just get 3 different answers, and of course that makes my job akin to kicking a field goal when no one really knows where the goal posts should be. But the positive impact CRM can have on an organization, when adopting a CRM mind-set makes sense, is irrefutable. And there are predictions that in just 10 years from now, AI and further technological advances will make today’s CRM look prehistoric by comparison.

See the full article here.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 80 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter, Vice President of CRM

#ecommercerecruiter, #e-commercerecruiter, #digitalmarketingrecruiter, #CMOrecruiter, #CRMrecruiter, #marketingrecruiter, #marketingheadhunter, #executiverecruiter

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Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Career Profression http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-and-ecommerce-career-progression/ http://www.bernhart.com/digital-marketing-and-ecommerce-career-progression/#respond Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:40:36 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2948 Many are aware that I schedule counseling sessions on Clarity.fm where I offer suggestions on resume construction and LinkedIn profiles, as well as digital marketing and ecommerce career progression. I am often asked: What is the one question candidates ask me the most? This one, BY FAR: “I feel stuck. How do I get to…

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Many are aware that I schedule counseling sessions on Clarity.fm where I offer suggestions on resume construction and LinkedIn profiles, as well as digital marketing and ecommerce career progression. I am often asked: What is the one question candidates ask me the most?

This one, BY FAR:

“I feel stuck. How do I get to that next step in my career with more responsibility, a bigger title and higher compensation?”

After nearly 30 years of executive search, I can tell you that is there is no one-size-fits-all strategy when it comes to digital marketing and ecommerce career progression. I’ve never talked with two candidates whose individual circumstances, past histories, industry preferences, educational backgrounds, career goals, etc. were the same, and there are many different paths one can take to get from A to B. I’ve seen candidates create entirely new roles within their existing company, while others have built their careers by making strategic sideways and off-the-ladder diagonal moves that served as perches for eventually moving up. Some have even stayed put with one employer and slowly climbed the corporate ladder.

But I tell everyone: Digital marketing and ecommerce career progression all starts with your resume, and without a strong resume, you put yourself at an immediate disadvantage. And I’m not just talking about formatting, or whether to include images, or how many pages your resume should be. There is one powerful aspect to resume writing that is frequently overlooked:

Instead of writing everything to the past or present, you should also try write it with what I call a “future voice.”

Digital marketing and ecommerce lends itself very well to this concept because they are job functions rather than industry categories. There are distinct titles that tend to distinguish one level of responsibility from another. There are individual contributors, there are Managers, Sr. Managers, Directors, Sr. Directors, VP’s and so on. You might have leap-frogged over a title along the way but chances are sometime during your career you’ll want make a run for that next title up, whatever it may be. And this is where candidates should think about painting their resumes with a slightly different brush, so that employers will view you not just for who you are and what you’ve been, but also for what you could become.

Let me give you an example.

Let’s say you’re a Manager of Digital Marketing, and let’s assume you’re on a dead-end path with little or no opportunity to move up with your current employer. As we know, Managers of Digital Marketing (which I’m roughly defining as those with up to around 10 years of experience, give or take) are hired for their hands-on expertise with channels and platforms. Some have managed a small staff and may have even had limited P and L, but their world largely revolves around projects and campaigns. But you’re ambitious. You want to be a Director someday, and you believe you have the skills, the track record and the confidence to get there. Directors live in a world of marketing programs, not just campaigns. They think in terms of a coherent business plan, a path towards reaching business objectives. They are a leader in planning and design, and they also typically have larger staffs so management and leadership skills become more important.

As as Manager, the depth of your experience in each of these elements may be limited, but perhaps not so far removed that you can’t include on your resume instances where you performed Director-like tasks. Perhaps you participated in higher level planning or strategy meetings with top leaders, or maybe led a team on a special project or multiple projects. You might have even made some key spending decisions or worked with an internal agency or shared services. There are lots of things Managers do that cross the Manager/Director divide, and by showcasing those Director-level abilities you will be presenting that experience in a light that supports your career goals. You will be viewed as more than just a Manager, but rather, as someone who is poised to take on next-level responsibilities. This approach helps to create an entirely different perception on the part of the employer about who you are. And if you don’t do it, no one else will.

Next time you refresh your resume, check how well you’re speaking in that “future voice”. You might just be surprised how much future you can find in your past, and give you digital marketing and ecommerce career progression a boost.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 80 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter

#ecommercerecruiter, #e-commercerecruiter, #digitalmarketingrecruiter, #CMOrecruiter, #CRMrecruiter, #marketingrecruiter, #marketingheadhunter, #executiverecruiter

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Success As a Loyalty Marketer http://www.bernhart.com/loyalty-marketer/ http://www.bernhart.com/loyalty-marketer/#respond Sun, 29 Oct 2017 22:34:03 +0000 http://www.bernhart.com/?p=2946 Not sure what it is, but I’ve been receiving steady calls and emails from companies that are currently on the hunt, or thinking about launching a search, for a Loyalty marketer, both Manger and Director-level. People not very familiar with loyalty marketing often confuse it with CRM. It’s sort of like comparing utility trucks and…

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Not sure what it is, but I’ve been receiving steady calls and emails from companies that are currently on the hunt, or thinking about launching a search, for a Loyalty marketer, both Manger and Director-level. People not very familiar with loyalty marketing often confuse it with CRM. It’s sort of like comparing utility trucks and passengers cars- they’re both motor vehicles, but they’re built to do different things. To help set the record straight, one of the best articles out there that dives into the differences appeared last summer in Loyalty360, written by Chris McLaren. You can read it here.

As a recruiter who has worked in the loyalty marketing space for more than 20 years, I’ve worked from literally thousands of CRM and loyalty-related job descriptions and written dozens of them myself. The basic skills required for successful performance as a loyalty marketer are fairly straightforward- defining the customer contact strategy, implementing strategies to keep customers engaged, expert analytical skills, etc. But there are key abilities that go far beyond the basic duties and responsibilities that are seen on a job description, and in recent years, they’ve taken on increasing importance. I believe that in the years to come they’ll become even more critical, so I thought this might be an appropriate time to look ahead, look between the lines of the typical job description for a loyalty marketer, and examine some of the other sought after qualities that employers look for in these highly valued “loyalists.”

Creative Thinking. It was written by the Greek Philosopher Plato that you are either creative or you’re not, that whatever creative ability you have you were born with. Fortunately, modern scientific theory refutes that theory. Interview questions that probe your ability to think creatively can get, well, pretty creative. You’d expect it. Candidates who’ve interviewed at Google have told me about some real mind-benders, such as: “How many piano tuners are there in the United States,” or, “Explain a database in three sentences to your 8 year old nephew”. While a loyalty marketer usually doesn’t take it to that extreme, they recognize the importance of being able to look at problems differently and creating new approaches to solve them.

Managing complexity. The world is a complex place, and customer loyalty programs by their very nature have many interlocking pieces. Building a customer rewards program that continues to generate interest, builds loyalty and results in more frequent and profitable customer touch points requires the orchestration of many moving parts. There are hundreds if not thousands of books, scholarly papers and even college courses on complexity management. While loyalty marketers are generally not experts in the analysis and optimization of complexity in a corporate enterprise, they should be aware that all business processes along the value chain are affected by complexity, and that the ability to turn complexity into a “value add” will lead to better operational performance.

Emotional Intelligence. Emotional intelligence has been widely researched for decades and is typically a key component of online assessment and personality profiles that many employers now include as part of their interviewing process. It’s been my experience that emotional intelligence is a hallmark trait among the most talented loyalty marketer leaders. Senior level loyalty marketers, like all other business leaders, need to have a high level of self-awareness as well as self-management and self-direction. The name of the game is creating a work environment where everyone works effectively. This becomes especially important for those in CRM who are building departments from scratch and who must engender trust and teamwork among disparate groups.

Strategic decision-making. When you think about it, strategic decision-making is the lifeblood of organizations. Decisions must be made against an ever-changing backdrop of uncertainty, where market conditions and the competitive landscape can change at the drop of a hat. Employers want a loyalty marketer who can obtain information and identify key issues relevant to achieving long-range goals. They want a loyalty marketer who can commit to a course of action after developing alternatives based on facts and logical assumptions. They also want a loyalty marketer who can develop strategies and tactics given available resources and existing constraints that align with the organization’s values.

Curiosity. The old saying “curiosity killed the cat” cautions against testing and experimentation. That might be sage advice if you manufacture high explosives, but in loyalty marketing, testing and experimentation are the name of the game. Employers look for loyalty marketers who can go beneath the surface and distill a problem down to a very clear set of hypotheses that can be tested, sort of the marketer’s version of the scientific method. Loyalty marketers are “police detectives” of CRM: They always ways to know more about who the customer is and what motivates them to make purchasing decisions.

Communication skills. Loyalty marketers often work within highly matrixed organizations. They need to influence stakeholders and they must be expert at using data to tell a story and explain technical concepts to non-technical people. They also are often tasked with building collaborative relationships cross-functionally. It takes strong verbal and written communication skills to accomplish these things. The complexities of today’s modern workplace demand it. In 2017, this will remain at or near the top of the most important skills that employers will be looking for in their loyalty marketer candidates.

Jerry Bernhart, Principal of Bernhart Associates Executive Search, LLC, is one of the nation’s preeminent and veteran executive recruiters in ecommerce, digital and multichannel marketing, and CRM. With more than 80 published LinkedIn articles, Jerry is the “voice” of best practices in the recruitment and hiring of ecommerce and digital marketing professionals. Jerry is also the author of the critically acclaimed book, “Careers in Ecommerce and Digital Marketing,” on Amazon, and participates in many leading digital marketing and ecommerce conferences. Jerry has been recruiting and placing marketing professionals for more than 28 years. Check out Jerry’s other insights on the Thought Leadership section of the Bernhart Associates website.

digital marketing recruiter, ecommerce recruiter, e-commerce recruiter, marketing recruiter, CRM recruiter, CMO recruiter, multichannel marketing recruiter, loyalty marketer

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